Let’s continue on Project ’37 Ford

As spring is fast approaching the pressure is on to get the Cabriolet ready.

Whitewall, dual exhaust, side mirror, full service and other small things will make this a nice cruiser. So let’s get started:
1937 Ford Goddies

Santa came early…or late…depending on if you are a glass half full or half empty kinda person. As much as I like things with a little patina and some history I also have a soft spot for nice new chromie thingies!! Outside mirrors, glove box, radiator cap, tank lid, battery holder downer (technichal term) and more.

1937 Ford Cabriolet Torpedo with mirrors

Mirrors installed. The enclosed hinge pin did not fit these hinges so I just made a pin. With the small back window in the convertible top the mirrors will be a welcome addition. The glass in these reproduction mirrors are not wide angle so they are still limited in what you can see. We will see how well they work once on the road. BTW: Check out that super cool torpedo hood!! This baby is sporting some LINES !!

1937 Ford Cabriolet Whitewalls.jpg

Man, Santa came again. He is a busy man…in the middle of April. Probably bored…

This time he brought snow white colored white wall tyres. How nice! As much as a car like this is predictable with white walls I still think they will be the cat’s pajamas on this maroon cabriolet. I plan to powder coat the wheels black and add a nicer Mercury style cap. I will keep the trim rings as well. Reliable sources tells me that more chrome and shiny stuff makes the car run better, faster and smoother. Honest!

1937 Ford Cabriolet tank lid

 The lockable filler cap is a nice option but what an ugly contraption, eh?
I opted for a smooth new one.

1937 Ford Cabriolet new tank lid
Mo betta! Strange reflection, though!

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet glove box

 There would not be a place to put my gloves unless there is a glove box.
I got this snazzy reproduction part but I realized quickly why the restorer/builder did omit it. They worked really hard on making the car look original. The original car did not have a voltage regulator but the more contemporary ABA flathead came with a generator that uses the more reliable but separate voltage regular. By now you have figured out where they hid said voltage regulator. Yup, where the glove box goes.

I have to move the regulator, maybe even to the engine compartment as it is not a big deal to me if the car looks totally stock. I do however like a place to put my gloves!

 Mo later…