BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part III

Seat Upholstery

The rear hump need a snazzy padded area for my rump to land on when I twist the throttle on this 1000 cc German powerhouse!. This is a thin wood board and carriage bolts will hold it in place.

Anti-spin! I tacked these thin metal strips to the carriage bolts so they would not spin when I snug up the bolts.

I used soft 1 inch foam here and wrapped it with black vinyl.

Here we are waiting for the contact cement to get tacky. This is not the first time this website get tacky. (Stolen joke from the muppet show)

In retrospect, (there is always retrospect when doing new things) I would have built this seat differently. I would have just made a pan that goes on top of the seat and just covered the pan. Oh well, this is how we learn. Now I will cover front and rear and then make a pad in the center. At 100 mph it will look just fine.

This is Landau foam. Same stuff goes under the vinyl on your grandpa’s Cadillac. It is also called upholstery bondo! I use it to smooth out or soften the subject before vinyl.

With vinyl.

For some interest, I will use this pleated vinyl for the seat portion. As the seat will be lower than the stock seat I opted for high density foam. I hope it will be comfortable enough.

I am not pleased with this but I will live with in for now.

So how did it come out?

Pretty damn good for a quicky!

With a full tank of fuel it weighs 360 lbs! The stock R100 is listed at 478 lbs.

The homemade shortys offers a hard knock sound with a buffalo fart during shifts and snap, crackle and pop on deceleration. Love it!

The vintage looking tires looks just at home on this bike. It handles great and have tons of power.

 Let’s RIDE!

BMW R100 Cafe Build, Part II

After polishing, Mr. Humpty-Dumpty rump looks pretty good as well.

For those of you that are old enough to remember The Fixx’s song “one thing leads to another…that’s just how it goes…one thing leads to another.

With my new snazzy rear end I could not clutter it up with a fender, tail lite or a license plate. I think I will mount the plate on the axle.

Yup, axle mounted license plate it is. The license light will be hidden under the seat.

 

Now the front fender is all the sudden too big. Also, that stainless bracket is totally overkill. So, bring on the diet program again.

 

The fender got a good haircut and I removed everything on the bracket that did not look like a bracket.

BMW used carriage bolts coming from the underside of the fender with ugly nuts and threads on full display on top of the fender. I reversed that using polished stainless carriage bolt for a smooth look. Besides, shiny stuff make the bike go faster.

As mentioned earlier,  I don’t want to clutter up the rear with a tail light. These are small Harley blinkers. I reworked the inside so it will accept a dual filament bulb. They will be responsible for tail light and stop light function…maybe even double as blinkers to!

 

The stock aluminum rims are in good condition but rather dull. Bring on the aluminum polish.

 

There, mo betta! Shiny good!…Also, new tires on both ends. These skinny ass tires with vintage tread pattern look right on this build.

 

This is the brake pedal and I took it off just to clean it. All the sudden I can’t live with that casting line. So…

 

Some grinding, sanding and buffing and we got ourselves a snazzy shiny pedal. As you know, shiny parts will increase power and speed.

 

I told you this was a budget build…no need to buy shorty mufflers. I took a hacksaw to the stock mufflers and made economy shortys or as some call them, Poor Man’s Rineharts” These pipes also gave the bike it’s name: “Loud mouth”

 Seat Upholstery next and wrap up.

BMW R100/7 Cafe Build, Part I

This bike had definitely been beaten with an ugly stick but it runs good. My plan for this bike was just to ride it over the summer to evaluate it and then I would build something cool. I was thinking a bobber style bike.

I just could not live with all the farkels so after an evening in the shop, the bike lost close to 75 lbs. Lighter = faster, right?

So here is bike 1.0 and I thought I could live with it for a season.

However…

I figured I would just do a quicky budget job on the bike, fix the seat and maybe spray bomb the tank so it looks a little better.

 

This is the stock rear sub assembly. Anything not needed including the lock assembly will be chopped off.

I shortened the rear hoop. I originally planned to use part of the seat foam but that got scrapped. More on this later.

 

I kept part of the stock front pan as it fits well to the tank but I added a new seat pan to fit the rear frame.

 

The plan is to have the angle of the rear hump line up with the frame.

 

Since I don’t have an English wheel…hell, I don’t even have a Swedish wheel !! so I decided to just create the hump with sheet metal and spend some time hammering in to shape.

A little mud, a little primer and we got a pretty good looking tail piece.

Since I got a new rear end I decided to give the tank some attention as well.

The yuge stock battery was located right in the middle of the frame. I would like to open up that area for that minimalistic look.

Talk about diet!! The original battery weighs 20 lbs! It is also 17 years old! Maybe time to replace it?  The lithium unit on the right is less that half the size and weighs a whopping 3.1 lbs! It is also good for 370 Cold Crank Amps.

The new battery will be housed in the new tail hump.

The plan was just to put a flat paint on the tank and tail hump but the flat clear came out kind of hazy so with nothing to loose I leaned in to it with a buffer.

Hey, that looks pretty good.

More later…

Mellanspel

“Mellanspel” is Swedish and directly translates to “Middle Play” as in something you would do in between. I am in the midst of a full on rotisserie restoration of a 1961 Volvo P1800. Doing a big restoration like this sometimes requires some “mellanspel” to keep your sanity.

I took a break from riding when I had back surgery but now when I am doing OK I decided to get back in to riding again. A world famous motorcycle philosopher once said: Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul”

I picked up a very nice original BMW R60/5 and it has been a great joy to be back on two wheels. Riding the R60 for a while I have come to appreciate the simplicity and the solid ride on these bikes. At the same time I got bitten by the cafe racer bug but cutting up this virgin R60 is not an option, besides, if I am going to race from cafe to cafe I need more powaa!!

So what to do?? A Mellanspel Project!

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad

So here is the “Mellanspel” project. A 1977 R100 bought from the 83 year old original owner. Needless to say, he did not worry about cosmetics but he changed oil every year in the 75K it has traveled. Runs strong.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-busy-rear

This must be the ugliest motorcycle rear that I have ever seen. Originally I figure I would ride it for a while just to get to know it but I can’t see myself riding around with all those “things” so I decided to at least strip the bike of anything not essential. You know, the old race trick: remove anything not needed to run.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-ugly-fairing

If you look up “ugly fairing” in the dictionary there will be a picture of this.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-naked-bike

Just removing all this junk it looks like a motorcycle again.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-chopping

This will probably get me banned from the BMW club but less is more. This is just a quicky job, the whole bike needs to be properly torn down and build right but it’s kinda fun to hack away a little.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-farkels

Pretty good pile of farkels.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-naked-and-better

I know, this is NOT a cafe racer yet but after shredding close to 100 lbs it sure looks better and should scoot along just fine. I also replaced the handlebars with a shorter version for an all business look. It rides great and now I can spend a month or so getting to know it before I tear it down.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-on-lift

Ergonomics Galore!

With a 25% off coupon this motorcycle lift came to $322 from that tool company. Hell, I could not get the materials to build one myself for that. What a back saver.

This should be a fun winter project. Zoom-Zoom!