BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part III

Seat Upholstery

The rear hump need a snazzy padded area for my rump to land on when I twist the throttle on this 1000 cc German powerhouse!. This is a thin wood board and carriage bolts will hold it in place.

Anti-spin! I tacked these thin metal strips to the carriage bolts so they would not spin when I snug up the bolts.

I used soft 1 inch foam here and wrapped it with black vinyl.

Here we are waiting for the contact cement to get tacky. This is not the first time this website get tacky. (Stolen joke from the muppet show)

In retrospect, (there is always retrospect when doing new things) I would have built this seat differently. I would have just made a pan that goes on top of the seat and just covered the pan. Oh well, this is how we learn. Now I will cover front and rear and then make a pad in the center. At 100 mph it will look just fine.

This is Landau foam. Same stuff goes under the vinyl on your grandpa’s Cadillac. It is also called upholstery bondo! I use it to smooth out or soften the subject before vinyl.

With vinyl.

For some interest, I will use this pleated vinyl for the seat portion. As the seat will be lower than the stock seat I opted for high density foam. I hope it will be comfortable enough.

I am not pleased with this but I will live with in for now.

So how did it come out?

Pretty damn good for a quicky!

With a full tank of fuel it weighs 360 lbs! The stock R100 is listed at 478 lbs.

The homemade shortys offers a hard knock sound with a buffalo fart during shifts and snap, crackle and pop on deceleration. Love it!

The vintage looking tires looks just at home on this bike. It handles great and have tons of power.

 Let’s RIDE!

The work continues, part IIII here

BMW R100/7 Cafe Build, Part I

This bike had definitely been beaten with an ugly stick but it runs good. My plan for this bike was just to ride it over the summer to evaluate it and then I would build something cool. I was thinking a bobber style bike.

I just could not live with all the farkels so after an evening in the shop, the bike lost close to 75 lbs. Lighter = faster, right?

So here is bike 1.0 and I thought I could live with it for a season.

However…

I figured I would just do a quicky budget job on the bike, fix the seat and maybe spray bomb the tank so it looks a little better.

 

This is the stock rear sub assembly. Anything not needed including the lock assembly will be chopped off.

I shortened the rear hoop. I originally planned to use part of the seat foam but that got scrapped. More on this later.

 

I kept part of the stock front pan as it fits well to the tank but I added a new seat pan to fit the rear frame.

 

The plan is to have the angle of the rear hump line up with the frame.

 

Since I don’t have an English wheel…hell, I don’t even have a Swedish wheel !! so I decided to just create the hump with sheet metal and spend some time hammering in to shape.

A little mud, a little primer and we got a pretty good looking tail piece.

Since I got a new rear end I decided to give the tank some attention as well.

The yuge stock battery was located right in the middle of the frame. I would like to open up that area for that minimalistic look.

Talk about diet!! The original battery weighs 20 lbs! It is also 17 years old! Maybe time to replace it?  The lithium unit on the right is less that half the size and weighs a whopping 3.1 lbs! It is also good for 370 Cold Crank Amps.

The new battery will be housed in the new tail hump.

The plan was just to put a flat paint on the tank and tail hump but the flat clear came out kind of hazy so with nothing to loose I leaned in to it with a buffer.

Hey, that looks pretty good.

More later…

BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part 2