1932 Ford hot rod: The fendering is finished

1932 Ford Five window Coupe fenders

After all the fenders had been test fitted I shot the inside of the fenders with etching primer and then applied a rubberized undercoating. This prevents “tneds”  That would be “dent” backwards as the rock would leave the tire and make an “outie” Get it?

 

1932 Ford Five window Coupe fenders

Also, the wheel wells got a shot of the undercoating as well.

 

1932 Ford Five window Coupe fenders

I made these simple upper shock mounts that clears the fender.

 

1932 Ford Five window Coupe fenders

Then it was time to squirt some paint on the frame rails as well.The rear quarter panel was not painted when I originally painted the cowl and doors to remove the ugly lettering so this was a good opportunity to make sure everything match.
Puh, that was a long sentence!

 

Back in the “showroom” for assembly. The Volvo wheel is just temporary until I get new rear rims. I ordered new 16’s with 5 on 4.5 bolt pattern in order to solve the axle width. This way I can eliminate the adapter and save an inch. Hopefully it will be enough as I really don’t want to tear down the rear axle this year.

 

Yup, the whole damn shop is red. My interior decorator is going to be sooo pissed!

The white paint on the headers was peeling badly and now would be the time to fix it.

As I will not run hood sides and the fenders and top hood with sort of picture frame the engine it better look good. This looks cleaner.

So how did it come out? Pretty damn good I think, It certainly changed the look and feel of the car.

 

The OE frame horn covers fits better than the repop

 

I was concerned that there would be too much red but the chrome acorns and adding a chrome license plate frame it looks pretty balanced.

 

The not so faux Olds engine is nicely framed between the hood and fenders.

I plan to change the top insert to black and also the dash and steering wheel should be black. For right now I just plan to drive the crap out of it.

1931 Ford roadster parts chasing

A hot rod should have it’s own personality and you don’t achieve this but installing mail order components. For example, I am always on the look-out for interesting guages for my hot rod builds. Usually something comes along that grabs my attention at a swap meet or in this case, my friends garage.

This 1947 Volvo PV 444 instrument cluster was doing service as garage art but now it will once again do what it was designed to do: report speed and other vital information about the engine.

The model A roaster will use this1932 style dash. I did not waste any time testing the fit. I approve. Volvo cluster it is.

Now I best get back to the ’32 Ford and the issues with the rear wheels.

Old Car Breakfast Meeting

The first Saturday in every month the Whidbey Island car guys get together for breakfast. It is mostly the very active model A gang that shows up but it is open to anyone with a love for old cars.

 

I showed up for one of these meeting on a 30 degree day in the middle of winter with a sheet of ice covering the road but all the model A guys rolled in with their old Fords.

Well, on a day like this, the first really sunny day of the year here in Washington the parking lot turned in to a mini car show.

 

I pulled out my Canon SLR camera only to find out that I left the SD card at home. You will have to live with these lousy cell phone pictures but you get the idea.

 

This tow truck has been restored to the exact colors and lettering as when it was new. The owner found pictures of the truck when it was new and duplicated everything. It is an amazing truck.

 

This 1929 Sport Coupe has been in the same family for 70 years and still going strong. The current owners’s dad rebuilt the engine in the fifties and he has not touched it since.

 

The 390 powered Galaxie convertible sporting Keystone wheels is a nice ride.

 

Gary Formhals, the current president of the Whidbey Island model A club is doing a great job keeping the club active with many activities. His model A pickup certainly shows his enthusiasm in the quality of the restoration.

 

One of your Humble Editor’s favorite body styles. These shoebox Fords are just very classy cars.

After breaking bread with some fun loving car enthusiasts I was on my way to take care of the rest of my day in my vintage Volvo 122S wagon. Enjoying a vintage car on a two lane black top country road is one of my favorite things to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Still Out There, Part IV

More junk:

We just love old cars in the wild. They are Still Out There

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

We just love old cars in the wild. They are Still Out There

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

Still Out There Part III

We just love cars in the wild. They are Still Out There

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

We just love cars in the wild. They are Still Out There

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

We just love cars in the wild. They are Still Out There

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

 

Still Out There: Ford

We just love cars in the wild. They are Still Out There

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

 

These pictures are for your entertainment purposes only. We DO NOT know where these cars are so don’t contact us and ask. WE DON’T KNOW.

1932 Ford five winda…fender install up-date

Burning the mid night oil on this one. I don’t want it to interfear with my day to day business so I get to work on this at night. Soon we will have hot rod weather in Washington state and this car needs to be READY for action!

 

After some slicing and dicing of the rear fenders they finally fit the body I am finally pretty happy with the fit. Applying Swedish Volvo standards to eighty year old American cars can cause hair dramatic loss though.

 

In the Uh-Oh department…You have heard the expression “Cause and Effect”…Well, this is a good example…I caused it…by hanging fenders…the effect is now that the axle width does not work with the fenders. Acually, multiple issues going on here. The axle is too wide and the wheel is not really centered in the wheel opening. The latter is a common deuce problem.

Now what? I will have to shorten the axle. If I tear it down I should fix the parallel ’36 rear bones as they are not really part of a good suspension. They should connect in the middle like stock. If I change the wish bones I need to re-route the exhaust. Then I may go to coil springs or coil overs for comfort.

Don’t you love hot rodding??!!

 

 

1932 Fender install project

The unboxed center of the frame still has the holes for the foot boards so I figured the location is pretty much the gospel. After installing the boards I can work from there.

 

So far so good. Stay tuned.

’32 Ford: Let’s get fendered…is that a verb??

Starting on this project…”luckily” the previous owner filled the fender bolt holes with mud. I just drilled through it and tapped out the cage nuts. Now I can hang the rear fenders.

We will see how the new fenders fit this 80 year old body.

The frame is not boxed in the center…that’s a good thing. The foot boards bolted up very nicely. now it’s time to test the fit of the front fenders.

Stay tuned…