BMW R100 Cafe Build, Part II

After polishing, Mr. Humpty-Dumpty rump looks pretty good as well.

For those of you that are old enough to remember The Fixx’s song “one thing leads to another…that’s just how it goes…one thing leads to another.

With my new snazzy rear end I could not clutter it up with a fender, tail lite or a license plate. I think I will mount the plate on the axle.

Yup, axle mounted license plate it is. The license light will be hidden under the seat.

 

Now the front fender is all the sudden too big. Also, that stainless bracket is totally overkill. So, bring on the diet program again.

 

The fender got a good haircut and I removed everything on the bracket that did not look like a bracket.

BMW used carriage bolts coming from the underside of the fender with ugly nuts and threads on full display on top of the fender. I reversed that using polished stainless carriage bolt for a smooth look. Besides, shiny stuff make the bike go faster.

As mentioned earlier,  I don’t want to clutter up the rear with a tail light. These are small Harley blinkers. I reworked the inside so it will accept a dual filament bulb. They will be responsible for tail light and stop light function…maybe even double as blinkers to!

 

The stock aluminum rims are in good condition but rather dull. Bring on the aluminum polish.

 

There, mo betta! Shiny good!…Also, new tires on both ends. These skinny ass tires with vintage tread pattern look right on this build.

 

This is the brake pedal and I took it off just to clean it. All the sudden I can’t live with that casting line. So…

 

Some grinding, sanding and buffing and we got ourselves a snazzy shiny pedal. As you know, shiny parts will increase power and speed.

 

I told you this was a budget build…no need to buy shorty mufflers. I took a hacksaw to the stock mufflers and made economy shortys or as some call them, Poor Man’s Rineharts” These pipes also gave the bike it’s name: “Loud mouth”

BMW Cafe Racer Build, part 3

BMW R100/7 Cafe Build, Part I

This bike had definitely been beaten with an ugly stick but it runs good. My plan for this bike was just to ride it over the summer to evaluate it and then I would build something cool. I was thinking a bobber style bike.

I just could not live with all the farkels so after an evening in the shop, the bike lost close to 75 lbs. Lighter = faster, right?

So here is bike 1.0 and I thought I could live with it for a season.

However…

I figured I would just do a quicky budget job on the bike, fix the seat and maybe spray bomb the tank so it looks a little better.

 

This is the stock rear sub assembly. Anything not needed including the lock assembly will be chopped off.

I shortened the rear hoop. I originally planned to use part of the seat foam but that got scrapped. More on this later.

 

I kept part of the stock front pan as it fits well to the tank but I added a new seat pan to fit the rear frame.

 

The plan is to have the angle of the rear hump line up with the frame.

 

Since I don’t have an English wheel…hell, I don’t even have a Swedish wheel !! so I decided to just create the hump with sheet metal and spend some time hammering in to shape.

A little mud, a little primer and we got a pretty good looking tail piece.

Since I got a new rear end I decided to give the tank some attention as well.

The yuge stock battery was located right in the middle of the frame. I would like to open up that area for that minimalistic look.

Talk about diet!! The original battery weighs 20 lbs! It is also 17 years old! Maybe time to replace it?  The lithium unit on the right is less that half the size and weighs a whopping 3.1 lbs! It is also good for 370 Cold Crank Amps.

The new battery will be housed in the new tail hump.

The plan was just to put a flat paint on the tank and tail hump but the flat clear came out kind of hazy so with nothing to loose I leaned in to it with a buffer.

Hey, that looks pretty good.

More later…

BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part 2 

Vintage Motorcycle show

Lawless Harley Davidson in Renton, WA decided to host a motorcycle show.

This is of course an excellent way of scoring goodwill with your customers and also give motorcycle enthusiasts a chance to show off their cool bikes. Heck, they may even sell a bike or two.

Let’s start with Mike Budshat’s 1930’s something Excelsior with a 250 Bultaco engine. It was raced by Bard Hanson and won many feature mains.

 

Bultaco 250 engine

Trophy porn

 

More Bultaco action. This is Justin Reinmuth 1966 Bultaco Mercurio 175.

 

On the description of the bike it was asked for the “cool factor” Mike simply wrote: “The Tank” No shit!

 

1966? Ducati Mark 3

 

Ducati engine porn

 

Ducati tool box porn

 

1931 Terott HSSL 350cc. From the LeMay family collection

 

1931 Terott HSSL muffler porn.

 

1966? Ducati

 

Ducati headlight porn.

 

Anyone studying vintage motorcycle racing will sure coma across the Rickman name as in Rickman frames. Rickman Motorcycles was a motorcycle chassis manufacturer spearheaded by Derek and Don Rickman.

 

Frame porn. Rickman made motorcycles from 1960 to 1975. Not only were these frames strong and allowed for excellent handling on the track, they nickel finish was an added bonus.

 

 

Luckiest kid evar…

 

Great show. I am personally interested in a Dyna Wide Glide so I asked a salesman if I could sit on a few.  However, he did not stop eating in front of me so I decided to keep looking. There are a lot of late model Harleys out there.

Jan-Olof “Jolo” Olsson 1958-2016

I met Jolo in school on the 9th grade in a small town called Tranemo in Sweden. He was into mopeds and all things mechanical just like myself. Once we became old enough to drive cars we focused on American cars. I drove a 1957 Chevrolet, Jolo drove his hot rodded Chevelle. We cruised our cars (Swedish Graffiti) as often as we could afford fuel and went to car shows together.

jolo-in-america

I moved to USA in 1982 but I stayed in touch with the old gang. Jolo and our friend Claes came over to America to visit in the early eighties. Here he is stylin’ next to a Chevrolet Impala.

They stayed at my house and when I came home from work they were sitting on the lawn by the street. I asked them why?
The answer was: “We are listening to V8 cars”

detroit-locker

Being all about cars, they visited several wrecking yards and they came home with several treasures. One of the finds were a Ford Detroit Locker third member. They built a cage in wood and added a handle so they could take it on the plane as carry on!! Those were the days!

claes-and-jolo

Since they are Chevy guys they were not pleased with this Ford part, hense the “holding your nose” pose. Note era correct clog footwear! (Jolo right)

I went back to Sweden this summer and met with Jolo. Jolo opened up his home and we spent the whole night talking about cars and hot rods.

1964 Ford Galaxie

The next day we went to the Wheels & Wings show in Falkenberg in his beautiful big block 4 speed 1964 Ford Galaxie. Here he is backing out of the driveway with nothing but a big grin on his face.

Crusing Sweden 2016

We spent the whole night cruising the town with Jolo and my friends Roland and Claes. It was like 35 years never happened! Bonus: My sister and her son came down to Falkenberg as well and we all had a great time.

Jolo left us very suddenly while working in his car shop. Claes was there and tried to revive him but Jolo had moved on to the big muscle car place in heaven.

jolo-in-car

Jolo, you will be missed! RIP.

 

Swindler’s 17th annual Poker Run

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So…it was that time again…time for the 17th annual World Famous Swindler’s Poker Run.

 

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With fuel tank full of decomposed dinosaurs and high expectations we started at the usual spot: Conway.

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Since I am hot-rod-less currently (horrible situation!) I was able to get a ride in this pile. The driver, my friend Chris insisted that the 327 small block should be approaching 6000 rpm before shifting to another gear. OK with me.

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Conway is a nice sleepy town with lot of history and lends itself to a great back drop for old cars.

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The surprise of the day was this 60’s style 1930 Ford Model A Sedan hot rod belonging to Mike Thompson. It was powered by a diesel! Why not, it’s a driver. The 4BT engine offers 265 ft lbs of torque at 1700 rpm! In other words, you shift at 2K !

 

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1932-ford-on-the-road

Traffic was really bad, old cars everywhere!

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Co is my Dog Pilot?? Hot Dog is my Pilot? Whatever…

 

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The Pacific North West is rather scenic. With the Puget Sound as a back drop, we stopped for a break along the shore.

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1932 Ford 3W coupe by the sea.

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Riviera by the sea…and a sign.

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Hot rods by the sea

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Refrigerator truck by the sea.

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Sam’s most excellent shoes box rollingin style.

 

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Model A Hot Rod truck by the sea.

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Rich’s 1957 Chevrolet truck.

 

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They don’t make hood ornaments like this anymore…well, they don’t make hood ornaments at all these days.

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I think they call this patina.

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No patina here…super nice 1940 Ford.

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Cool sedan.

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The day was ended at Paul’s upholstery shop for some show and tell. Great day.

Mellanspel

“Mellanspel” is Swedish and directly translates to “Middle Play” as in something you would do in between. I am in the midst of a full on rotisserie restoration of a 1961 Volvo P1800. Doing a big restoration like this sometimes requires some “mellanspel” to keep your sanity.

I took a break from riding when I had back surgery but now when I am doing OK I decided to get back in to riding again. A world famous motorcycle philosopher once said: Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul”

I picked up a very nice original BMW R60/5 and it has been a great joy to be back on two wheels. Riding the R60 for a while I have come to appreciate the simplicity and the solid ride on these bikes. At the same time I got bitten by the cafe racer bug but cutting up this virgin R60 is not an option, besides, if I am going to race from cafe to cafe I need more powaa!!

So what to do?? A Mellanspel Project!

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad

So here is the “Mellanspel” project. A 1977 R100 bought from the 83 year old original owner. Needless to say, he did not worry about cosmetics but he changed oil every year in the 75K it has traveled. Runs strong.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-busy-rear

This must be the ugliest motorcycle rear that I have ever seen. Originally I figure I would ride it for a while just to get to know it but I can’t see myself riding around with all those “things” so I decided to at least strip the bike of anything not essential. You know, the old race trick: remove anything not needed to run.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-ugly-fairing

If you look up “ugly fairing” in the dictionary there will be a picture of this.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-naked-bike

Just removing all this junk it looks like a motorcycle again.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-chopping

This will probably get me banned from the BMW club but less is more. This is just a quicky job, the whole bike needs to be properly torn down and build right but it’s kinda fun to hack away a little.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-farkels

Pretty good pile of farkels.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-naked-and-better

I know, this is NOT a cafe racer yet but after shredding close to 100 lbs it sure looks better and should scoot along just fine. I also replaced the handlebars with a shorter version for an all business look. It rides great and now I can spend a month or so getting to know it before I tear it down.

1977-bmw-r100-slash-7-motorad-on-lift

Ergonomics Galore!

With a 25% off coupon this motorcycle lift came to $322 from that tool company. Hell, I could not get the materials to build one myself for that. What a back saver.

This should be a fun winter project. Zoom-Zoom!

Crusing Falkenberg, Sweden 2016

So…if you go to any car show in the US you will notice the complete lack of cars with fins. You know, pretty much anything made in America between 1957 and 1961.

1958 DeSoto

1958 DeSoto

Sure, there is the ever popular 1957 Chevrolet but other than that, fins cars are hard to find. You will see plenty of sixties cars and of course stockers and hot rods from the thirties.

1958 Dodge convertible

1958 Dodge convertible

So where did they all go?? The answer is…Sweden! Ever since the early seventies, the Swedes have had an insatiable appetite for the skyward rear ends and they have been importing anything with fins.

At one point in the seventies, the Swedish import harbor looked like a Sears parking lot in 1961.

The larger the fin, the more popular.

1959 Dodge

Anything Mopar is probably is probably on top of the list like this 1959 Dodge.

1959 Cadillac

Second on the list would probably be the 1959 Cadillac.  These bullet tail light equipped cars have been displayed in Swedish motor magazines ad nausea.

1958 Cadillac convertible

1958 Cadillac Convertible

1958 Dodge convertible

1958 Dodge Convertible

1958 Dodge Custom Royale

1958 Dodge Custom Royale

Another mind blowing event in Sweden’s car world is…cruising. So what, you say? We cruise here in the States don’t we? Yeah, we have the Woodward cruise and similar event but in Sweden the art of cruising is perfected.

1961 chrysler

1961 Chrysler

1963 Chrysler Imperial Convertible

1963 Chrysler Imperial Convertible. At 4840 lbs or 2400 kg for your metric dudes this car is not a lightweight. A 413 cu/inch V8 helps motivate this rare car only made in 531 examples.

1964 Ford Galaxie

My ride to the event: 1964 Ford Galaxie with a hot bog block and Tremec five speed. Could be worse.

1964 Ford Galaxie wrenching

Unlike today’s “solid state” cars, when you have a car with both carburetor AND distributor there will be some tuning and adjustments. In this case one of the plugs gummed up offering us a 7 cylinder ride. It was fixed quickly.

1969 Camaro wrenching

Then it was the Camaro’s turn. The tight fit in the engine compartment caused the firewall to push off one of the ignition wires resulting in another 7 cylinder car! Well, that was fixed as well and off we went.

When your humble editor lived in Sweden in the seventies I used to hang out with some guys that drove American cars. Yup, that is about forty years ago.  Then they all left the American cars behind and started families.  Now the kids are grown and it’s once again time to get behind the wheel of some Detroit iron.

The Gang in Sweden

From the left we have Claes and his son in law,  Roland and Jolo.

Wheels and Wings Falkenberg Sweden

It is hard to grasp the size of this meeting as the camera lens can not capture it all.

With a huge meeting like this, the local city gives up it’s street to organized cruising. Alcohol plays a large roll in cruising and in Sweden it is allowed to be consumed inside the car.  However,  the written (and unwritten) rule is that the driver never touch the stuff.

Crusing Sweden 2016

At this point, my mode of transportation had changed to a 1966 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible. This offers a 360 degree view of the cruising.

As the strong European beer and booze get consumed the passengers and spectators become more rowdy as the evening progresses. It goes on way in to the early morning.

Crusing Sweden 2016 Falkenberg

The whole town is shut down and the locals enjoy classic cars cruising all night long.

I could not think of a better way to spend time with my old cruising buddies. Good times, good times indeed!

1971 BMW R60/5 motorcycle

I always loved the look of vintage BMW motorcycles and their engines. I figured I would build a custom BMW bike at some point.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle side

Just to see what’s out there, I clicked on motorcycles on that local interweb classified page. One should never click in classifieds that may contain your dream ride but there it was…a 1971 R60/5 and yes, it followed me home. What can I say!

As an original unmolested bike it would be a shame to tear it apart to build a custom. I think this bike should remain pretty much stock and enjoyed as it is.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle logo

The R60/5 was produced between 1970-1973. The 599cc engine was rated at 46hp @ 6,600rpm and could move the 440 lbs. bike to a top speed of 102mph.

Prior to the R60/5 the BMW motorcycles was rather sluggish and boring.

BMW stole Hans-Günther von der Marwitz from Porsche and that was a good thing as his first job was to design a new bike…this one.

The new design called for an improved engine. The engine now uses a chain driver cam shaft and the connecting rods came from the 2.8-liter 6-cylinder car engine. The electrical system was upgraded with a 12-volt alternator and electric starter.

The new tubular frame was lightweight and 7.3-inch drum brakes were responsible for the stopping part. Another brilliant design solution by Hans-Günther (yeah, I feel like I am on a first name basis with this dude) was that the drive shaft also served as part of the swing arm.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle

The suitcases…ahem, the saddle bags are like new, not a scratch.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle saddle bags

The seat is perfect as well.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle original keys

It came with original keys for the saddle bags and the seat lock.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle bike cover

Bike cover…then again, why would you want to cover this beauty? I can just sit and look at it!

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle Mikunicarb

The previous owner just added these Mikuni carbs. The work well so I will just leave them. I did get the original Bing carbs with the bike.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle Tools

A full set of the original tools was found under the lockable seat.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle manuals

Repair manual and the original owner’s manual complete with previous owner’s handwritten notes.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle headlight chrome

I am a firm believer in “less is more” so I think this chrome bar need to go. I like chrome and cool accessories as much as the next guy but these vintage BMW bikes bring out the practical utilitarian in me.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle lights

More “take off” stuff. These LED auxiliary lights are brighter than the stock head light but they don’t look right on this bike. So off they go. Maybe they get recycled as back up lights on my truck or something.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle take offs

BMW R60 diet:

None of this is needed to ride this bike and it looks better and cleaner as well.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle headlight yellow bulb

Do like the French…use a condom…safety first you know! This cover makes the white H4 bulb emit…you guessed it…Yellow light!  Looks great on a black bike.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle headlight yellow

Without the head light bar. Looks cleaner.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle mirror

The bar end mirrors did not look era correct so they had to go in favor of these perfect stock units.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle rear shocks

Sexy! The new rear shocks came delivered in red fishnet stockings. This are IKON brand and they have both adjustable pre load settings and rebound. I added for the top cover as that makes them look like a factory part.

 

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle top

There it is. Lighter, cleaner and meaner as in pure motorcycle.It will be a great summer.