1931 Ford Model A Tudor Hot Rod Project, part 5

Someone tried to open the door with an axe, not recommended.
In order to get access, I removed the inner panel.

Using a good door as a donor, I got myself a repair panel.

A little mud and some primer and we got ourselves a snazzy new door. I spent a lot of time to make sure the door fit the body. Feels good to knock off another item on the list.

Next: headlights. I am guessing these are from a truck. They have a Ford script so the must be good, right?

They cleaned up good.

In order to prevent any binding in the spring, I made sure it has the same angle as the cross member. This will determine the location of the rear radius rods.
Turns out all roads leads to where the transmission cross member will be. By “roads” I mean the rear rods and the front split wishbones. Since that is the case, I will make the cross member the central mounting point for all rods.
The rear rods will be connected in one central swivel point just like Ford designed it.
Now if you excuse me, I am going for a ride on the cafe racer. More later…

BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part IIII

The summer in the North West have been absolutely perfect for anyone enjoying motorcycles…and dry roads!

I have been busy riding the BMW Cafe bike to the point I have not spent much time working on it. I am really liking how it handles and the power available mostly because of the serious diet I exposed the bike to.

Like any project, there is always room for improvement especially on this bike as it was a quick build. Just in time for the monthly backfire moto meet in Seattle, I got this snazzy Monza style gas cap.

 

Made in Germany, it offers excellent fit and finish. It also added about 12 horsepower.

 

I am using the small Harley blinker for tail and stop light and they were not very bright. One of the most important things you can do on a motorcycle is to be seen!

I installed these super bright LED bulbs and I probably increase the output three fold while using less load on the electrical system.

Riding a stripped down bike means that there is no place to put things and I have to at least have some tools, right?

I found this tool box at a swap meet, I was told it was from an Honda. It ended up under the seat for now. I may move it to the front of the frame, behind the fork, we’ll see.

 

It holds all of the BMW factory tools.

I replaced the valve covers with a set of the older style valve covers, they definitely changes the vibe of the bike. Next…I would like to change the gauges, we’ll see what I can come up with.