Project ’37 Ford Cabriolet, exhaust

Project 1937 Ford Cabriolet came with a stock single exhaust and it was hitting the frame so I had to remove it anyway. I decided to start from scratch.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust flanges

These are the old pipes, they look a bit tired.

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet  exhaust flange new

I kept the flange and went to work.

1937 Ford Cabriolet spagetti

Look, a 1937 Ford exhaust. What, you can’t see it?? Well, let me show you.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaustThese are the smallest Thrush glass packs I could find.

Thrush had an ad in the sixties that said: Put a Thrush on your pipe and…smoke it! I doubt we can smoke anything with this stock flathead but I am counting on some good flathead sound emanating from the dual pipes.

I could not resist adding for the electric cut-outs. I am sure with these small glass packs I will have a nice rumble out the rear but there might be a time when an uncorked flathead will be music to ones ears. Off road of course. They come with wiring and one switch that opens both simultaneously. Yes, I did test them, they work on 6 volts as well. The switch looks like a modern power window switch so obviously I would have to hide it under the dash.
1937 Ford Cabriolet Exhaust work 3

The angle iron: Your best friend when making exhaust.

1937 Ford Cabriolet Exhaust work

It is great to line up tubes when you are going to weld them together. I tacked everything together first and then did a test fit on the car.

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust cut outs

The exhaust cut-outs are designed for 3 inch exhaust pipes. The dual system I am building is based on 1 1/2 inch pipes so we have to be a little creative.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust set up

The mufflers and exhaust cut outs needed to be compact so I came up with the idea of cutting down the muffler and insert it in the Y-pipe.

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust set up finished

Here is the compact solution, the world famous Super Sonic Muffler Cut-Out Device.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust tip polish

The last 36 inches of the exhaust is stainless so I polished it to chrome finish. Now I don’t have to worry about adding chrome tips.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust paint Once all welded up I coated everything with high temp paint. Yes, I wear a respirator even when painting with spray cans. Most paint spray cans contains nasty stuff. You only have one pair of lungs.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust finished

Here it is. A complete 1937 Ford dual exhaust system.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust insulation

It is tight on the drivers side because of the steering box. I have to dip down below the frame and that makes part of the exhaust close to the master cylinder. I added insulation to the pipe to keep the heat away from the master cylinder.

1937 Ford Cabriolet dual exhaust Here is a side view of the exhaust.

1937 Ford Cabriolet exhaust tip

Well, here we are. All done. A drive around town confirmed a nice mellow note. Also the restored plate is in place and a vintage frame adds the finishing touch.

Ready for the up-coming Ford Meet.

Make your modern battery look vintage

Todays modern dry or gel cell batteries are usually more dependable and powerful than the old style flooded batteries. Also, they are safer without the corrosive acid.

However…BIG PROBLEM…for us who like old cars; They sure don’t look sexy in the engine compartment of a vintage car. It is OK if they are hidden but if they are visible in the engine compartment it just looks wrong. We need to come up with a solution. Working on our Project 1937 Ford Cabriolet we came up with the following:

Battery-in-a-box-solution

1937 Ford Cabriolet Vintage battery fix

Here is my ugly but good 6 Volt battery.

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet Vintage battery fix2

Here is a plastic box and top that looks like an old timey battery that I found at the swap meet.

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet Vintage battery fix3

Here is the modern ugly battery in the box.

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet Vintage battery fix4

Here is the box with the ugly battery hidden by the lid. Looks old-timey to me.

Problem solved.

I may add some faux lead connectors on top of the box if I have time, we’ll see…

Winter Swedish Meet

The Tripple X burger restaurant in Issaquah Washington hosts some kind of car event just about every weekend. The local Volvo club has a meet every February, rain or shine. This time it was a little more rain than shine but Volvo folks (and Volvos) are a hardy so Swedish cars filled the parking lot. As usual Volvo have the largest representation but a few Saabs participated as well.

Volvo Saab Meet, Volvo Duett

This restored Volvo Duett is beautiful. The favorite among tradesmen in Sweden when new and most of them were pretty beat up just after a few years. Even the local fish mongler enjoyed the utility of this car so it earned the nickname “Fish car” in Sweden.

Volvo Saab Meet, Volvo PV

Since we assume you can read, we also assume that you can tell that this is a 1957 Volvo 444 next to a 1953 Volvo 444. Both in excellent condition and driven often.

Volvo Saab Meet, Volvo 122S wagon

Lowered and with some wider rims this 1968 Volvo 122S wagon is sporting some attitude. Last year for the 122 in the US market.

Volvo 1800S

What would a Swedish meet be without the Volvo 1800S?

RM1800

While infuriating all the English auto manufacturers Sir Roger Moore opted for this Swedish sport car in the TV series “The Saint”  instead of one supported by the infamous Lucas electric system. He probably wanted to have lights working when chasing the bad guys.

 

Saab Sonett

All wrapped up! This Saab Sonett had been completely wrapped in vinyl media. The owner told me that it was a lot of work but now he has a very unique Saab, not to mention chip resistant.

Saab Sonett Rear panel

Saab V4 red front

This Saab V4 rolled in and drew a big crowd quickly. This car had been treated to a very nice restoration.

Saab V4 red

Saab V4 engine

Half a V8. The V4 from European Ford did offer the Saab decent power and was rather reliable.

Please find below just an boring ordinary Volvo DL

Volvo 242DL with V8

Well, I must say it is very nice but it is still just a boring plain Volvo DL…right??

Volvo 242DL with V8 Corvette engine

Wrong!

With an LS fuel injected Corvette engine and a 5 speed this car is anything BUT boring. The installation looks like the factory did it and that is the golden rule in engine swapping. The builder did everything right, right down to the shifter coming out of the stock location. The owner claims everything is holding up well. Sleeper City! Nice work.

Saab 900

This Saab 900 brings back fond memories for your Humble Editor as my first job in America was to work on these.

 

Vintage Brochures: 1937 Ford Cars

I enjoy reading the original sales brochures for vintage cars and motorcycles, especially for the cars that I own. It is fun to see how there were marketed back then.

1937 Ford Cabriolet brochure cover.jpeg

I got this one from that auction site and it arrived in a soft envelope stamped “Do Not Bend”.
So what does my fine post office professional do? Yup, you guessed it: They bend it.

I managed to “unbend” the brochure and all is good. However,  the astute eBay peddler stated in his description that “they could be a reproduction but could also be original” Yeah, right! Looks like it was printed yesterday, it looks BRAND NEW, smells BRAND NEW, it probably IS brand new. It absolutely does NOT look like a document printed 74 (SEVENTYFOUR!) years ago. There is a huge difference. I think it is an insult but I pretty much knew what I was getting based on the above “keep-my-ass-covered-description” but I wanted a nice copy basically for the content. So…moving on.

1937 Ford Cabriolet brochure

Because of our Project 1937 Ford Cabriolet I had to immediately flip to the Cabriolet page! …and look at that: I learned something right away:

Can you see what it is? Well, Ford calls it a “Cabriolet Convertible”, not just one or the other. So I guess that would not be a double negative? Or in this case double positive!

New for the year was “Modern appearance, new streamline design”

1937 Ford Cabriolet lid type hood

Another new feature was the lid style hood for easy servicing and under hood mounted battery also made life easier for the Ford mechanic.

1937 Ford Cabriolet brochure flathead v8

Ford also bragged about a modern compact V-type engine, and “Center-Poise Ride increased by smoother action of long tapering springs” and a new worm and roller steering gear with 18.2 :1 ratio that makes the 1937 Ford easier to handle. Man, I feel like I am in heaven already.

Further features includes “Chromium Plated radiator grille and rustless steel running board mouldings and Genuine Leather seats”

How can anyone go wrong? Trade in your old 1932 Ford and pick one up today! Oh, that’s right, I just did.

Well, I will be cruising in style firmly planted on the Genuine Leather seating, barely feeling the road thanks to Center-Poise Ride springs while the Chromium plated radiator grille points the way!

Now that’s STYLING!

Vintage heaters

“I like to be comfortable”

That includes not being cold! Cars did not get heaters installed from the factory until the late fifties in most cases. They showed up even later in trucks. Our Project 1937 Ford Cabriolet did not come with a heater and while top down cruising in eighty degree weather is…FABOULUS…but…it is NOT fun to be cold in a car. What’s the point if you are not comfortable in your favorite ride?

I really wanted a roadster next but here in Washington state you have few days when you can be comfortable without side windows. The 1937 Ford Cabriolet with roll up windows changes all that. Go with top down when you feel like it but top and windows up when it is nippy or wet out there. The best of both worlds. So how are we going to heat the cabin on those cold days?

With a cool (actually warm) vintage heater of course. These can be found on swap meets starting around ten dollars. They usually comes with a 6 volt fan motor and thru the firewall plumbing.

1937 Ford Cabriolet heater Corvette core

This is the actual heater box from a mid fifties Ford truck. I cut off everything that did not look like a heater and ended up with just the box. The heater core I also found at a swap met and is supposed to come from a Corvette. I paid fifteen dollars for it and it appears to be new and never installed.

After trimming off the tubes the core fits nicely in the old Ford box. My initial though was to install a flat brushless fan in the back but I think I need more capacity knowing this is a convertible. I will probably use an external “turbo” fan. More on that later…and when I find one.

This heater and many others needs a nice grille of some kind. I was looking on-line for some sorts of expanded metal or grid that could be polished. Nothing…so let’s put the thinking cap on. Where do we see cool materials used? Mmmm. Elevator interiors have always fascinated my as they have such cool material and a lot of it is stainless, that may be something to pursue?

I found a company close to work that makes elevator interiors. How about that?

1937 Ford Cabriolet heater grill

A quick drive and a box of doughnuts later I had this in my hand. It is a stainless wowen grid. How perfect! It reminds me of the cloth used on the front of old radios.

Let’s give it a try:

1937 Ford Cabriolet heater grille installed

Oh Yeah, Baby! That works! Looks like the material was made for this project.

Now I have to figure out what color to paint the box and front trim. I am thinking a mix of hammer paint and wrinkle. Stay tuned and you will find out.

More on this later…