Finville, USA

Welcome to: Finville, USA

“A place where steel sharks are still lurking, flanked by rocket outlets and chrome”

  1960 Plymouth1960 Plymouth

Photo (and owner)  Jon Radue from Wisconsin, USA

stude tailight

Fins doesn’t have to be stock to be enjoyed.

Steve Gould Colorado Springs, CO sent us this picture of this custom truck.

1960 Tbird

1960 T-bird

Photo: Casey Tarp

Fleetwood in The Rain

1960 Fleetwood in the rain

Photo: Wayne Liles from Asheville N.C.

1961 Cadillac fin aiming for the sky...

1961 Cadillac fin aiming for the sky…

Photo: Heine Hansen

60impala

Jim from Canada sent us this shot of his 1960 Impala:

wing caddy

1960 Cadillac

Lloyd , Cindy and Damiën  from the Netherlands sent us this photo.

57chev

1957 Chevrolet

64ch300
1964 Chrysler 300 Convetible

Photo: Michael Clay Andersen

Dodge

Photo: Gary Baker

58limriv

1958 Buick Limited Riviera
Photo: Kris Trexler

58mark

1958 Continental Mark III coupe
Photo: Kris Trexler

plaza

Plymouth Plaza

imperial

1960 Chrysler Imperial

1960ford

1960 Ford

1960 buick

The fins on the 1960 Buick became somewhat more sedate than the ’59 Delta wings, but they are very classy. This photo came from the owner of this 1960 Buick LeSabre Convertible, Denis Lachapelle from Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

58ford

This 58 Ford Fairlane 500 is looking awesome at this angle.

Photo: Charlie Barone

1959 Dodge

Very few fin-cars can compete with the rocket outlets and chrome of the ’59 Dodge. Is this the ultimate set of fins??

1959 chevrolet

The gull-wing fins of the 1959 Chevrolet has always been a favorite.

1964 cad

The Cadillac fins got smaller for every year. This 1964 Cadillac shows what’s left. Check out the reflection in the paint, a 1963 Corvette split-window!

desoto

This 1959 DeSoto Sportsman are sporting some aggressive fins.

58century

58 Buick offered some very massive fins, as on this Century.

57olds

This 1957 Olds remind you how much the designers were inspired by space design.

1959 Lincoln

Ok, these are rather modest fins for the late 1950’s…However, this 1959 Lincoln convertible is sporting a very massive rear treatment, with acres of chrome.

59cad

The 59 Cadillac is probably the most recognized fins in the world. And yes, they are still cool!

59electra

The 1959 Buick fins were called “Delta Wings”, as shown on this Electra, in a rare rose color.

60cadThe 1960 Cadillac is sporting smaller and more restrained fins. Many folks thinks the ’60 Cadillac is a better looking car than the ’59. That discussion will go on until the world ends or internet stops.

Why would you drive a vintage car anyway??

My late model work car is equipped with all the comfort features I could ever need. It has a nice quiet cabin, climate control, nice stereo and don’t forget the bun heaters! Going to work on a soggy cold morning is not that bad once you get inside this cozy cage. I am isolated from road and engine noises and I can stream music or news from anywhere in the world and listen to it with the twelve speakers. Why does one need twelve speakers anyway?

1937 Ford Convertible Cabriolet

Driving a vintage car or truck takes some effort and involvement. They don’t have the best brakes, the steering is a bit sloppy and the wind noise…don’t forget the wind noise. It’s hard to have a cell phone conversation in a vintage car…but why should you?? You should listen to your vehicle and be one with it. The 1937 Ford I currently have the custodial rights over is one of those “old cars”

The 1939 transmission with second and third gear syncros is actually an upgrade from the stock non syncro transmission this car came with. Driving a car like this is a way to celebrate the way it was. Not necessary waxing nostalgically about “it was better back then” but it is an opportunity to really get in the head of the folks that built them and drove them when they were new.

You feel you are part of the machine and the history.

Picture this:

You blip the throttle and double clutch as you approach an intersection while still moving and feel first gear just slips in without a noise…THAT is a pure man and machine experience. Then go around the corner and hit second gear right at that torque spot and feel the flathead pull the car forward. No tachometer, no automatic shifter, no computer…just you knowing your machine and what it can do and also know it’s limitation. How can you not love it??!

Sigh, this may be hard to explain to some twenty year old kid in a Honda sporting a sewer pipe for an exhaust pipe…but I will try if anyone want to listen!

 

Still Out There, vintage tin waiting for someone to rescue

We continue our series Still Out There.

Vintage tin is still sitting around for someone to save them from the crusher. I don’t know where these cars are today or if they still are around but that’s not the point.

Go out on a car or truck safari sometime.

Here is some inspiration:

Skoda Cabriolet

How about a super rare Russian Skoda convertible? Stock or custom, it could be cool.

Scoda Cabriolet 2

The interior could clean up very well. A turbo charged 4 cyl with a five speed? You would be the ONLY one at the car show!

Old Volvo 122S Sedan

Since we are looking at furrin’ material…here is a 1962? Volvo with the old style grille. Could make for a nice car if fixed up. Still being driven at this point.

 

Volvo 122 wagon

More Swedish iron. This 1967 wagon is a desirable car for vintage Volvo enthusiasts.

Black Falcon

 

 

This flat black Falcon was being used as a daily driver. I can think of worse cars. I think some shiny paint and it will be someone’s cruiser.

Chevrolet Monte Carlo

1970 Monte Carlo as seen outside a tire shop. It is fun to see nice iron being used as daily drivers as opposed to the standard econo boxes. This car is sporting the worlds longest hood. Cool design. The Monte Carlo was actually built on the Chevelle cowl. That actually opens up some possibilities: The Chevelle was available as a convertible. Imagine a Monte convertible. Someone needs to do this. Just saying!

Econolines

Econolines anyone? These have some cool lines and deserves to be rescued. In these early 60’s vans you can still see the Edsel DNA in the head light surrounds.

Do yourself a favor…find a vintage car, truck or motor cycle and fix it up to your liking and then DRIVE IT !

 

Let’s detail the 1937 Ford

The last weekend offered temperatures in excess of seventy degrees, something that is unheard of in Late March in this part of the country. Needless to say it would be a felony to leave an open car in the garage under such circumstances…not to mention the fact that the open car in question is a super cool flathead powered 1937 Ford Cabriolet!

Anyway, the car got some miles on it and the only problem I encountered was to wipe that stupid grin off my face but the weekend is over and it is time to look over this beauty. I need to detail it, do a service and check general tune of the car so it’s ready for action this summer season.

1937 Ford Cabriolet art deco nose

How can you NOT like this Art Deco style?

1937 Ford Cabriolet clean rear

Daum…this thing is clean in every corner. I am not a big fan of blue dots but they will stay for now.

1937 Ford Cabriolet headlight

Love this! OK, I am getting a little too excited now. Let’s get back to work.

I am sure you have seen those ads for some snake oil miracle paint rejuvenator or some other auto detail product: They usually have a slightly faded but super straight rust free 1967 Camaro Z-28 or a 1970 Hemi Charger they just found in a barn and all it need is a detail. Yeah right??
If and when
I find a Hemi Charger in a barn it would be rusted up to the door handles, the engine replaced with a stuck slant six and the interior would have been eaten alive by various animals who made it their home (and toilet!)  Sure, that will BUFF out !

Anyway, THIS car is actually like that snake oil car. It just need a proper detail and it should really make for a nice 1937 Cabriolet. The reason for this is of course the fact that it was completely restored and not driven much since then. That kinda helps!!
1937 Ford Cabriolet up in the air

Well, let’s get this thing jacked up…so to speak. After removing the rolling stock I get a chance to see the suspension properly and I can only confirm that everything seems to be in great shape.

1937 Ford Cabriolet clean suspension

The wheel wells also looks very nice and clean. All brackets have been cad plated and all rubber seems fresh. I can’t complain.The fenders have a rubberized coating under them to protect them from “tned”. That is “dent” backwards. That is what you get when a rock leaves the tire at high speed and makes a dent from the inside. Dent but backwords = tned. Now you know…

 

1937 Ford Cabriolet brakes

After removing the drums I discovered new brake shoes and hydraulics so there was nothing for me to other check adjustment. My work is done here.
1937 Ford Cabriolet banjo wheel

When did you last time polished between the spokes??
1937 Ford Cabriolet license plate

A swap meet visit yielded this vintage license frame for $15.00. It will help dress up the restored 1937 WA plate. I think I need to make a backing plate for this as well since it sits on top of the post with the backside exposed.

1937 Ford Cabriolet tires

I plan to add wide white walls to this car but the tire I want is on back order so I have to roll on these black walls for now. That will not be a problem as the Pirelli piecrust tires are in great shape. Kinda cool, actually…

More later…

 

Vintage Vehicle License Plates

Just like most things even license plates were nicer in the “old days” Plates were replaced every year and it keep the prison population busy with work. Just like cars back then each year offered a different look or color.

1930WAplate

In these days of globalization and standardization even license plates are becoming a boring commodity with every year looking the same. Luckily for us vintage car and motorcycle enthusiasts Washington state has a YOM (Year of Manufacture) program that allows you to register your collector car for life with a YOM plate. You only need one plate and that itself is a blessing as many vintage cars looks their best without a distracting plate in the nose. Also, sometimes you can only find one plate.

HOT ROD PLATE

The first job is to locate a plate of the same year as your car. Your car needs to have a current registration in order to apply the YOM plate. If you don’t have your car currently registered all you have to do is pay for one year of registration. You will also pay a one time fee for the YOM plate addition. It is usually the same fee as a vanity plate. Once registered with the YOM plate you never have to pay for plates or license again. You are somewhat restricted as to how much you can drive the car as this program is not designed for daily drivers.  You can use the vehicle for pleasure driving, to and from car shows and test drives etc. It is not a good idea to abuse this as politicians are always keen on looking for new ways to milk our automobile fleet in order to fund new pet project.

OLD PLATE

I look forward to install this beauty on our Project 1937 Ford:

plate

BTW: “C” stands for Spokane County. Not only will collector plates save you money in the long run, the plate itself makes your vintage vehicle look…you know…vintage.

N.W. Vintage Racing Pictures, part I

In a former life I was in the antiques business and I purchased a box full of old 8X10 black & white photos from the racing action on Aurora Speedway in Washington state. Some of these photos were taken before the war ended and I think they have a significant historic value.

Aurora Speedway Program

As you can see by the program above, Bob Murray’s Dog house was a proud sponsor and also a popular watering hole where drivers and fans would gather to talk about racing.

The Playland Amusement Park on 132nd and Aurora in Washington State hosted the  Aurora Speedway. Before, during and after the war people was looking for entertainment. With cars making folks more mobile than ever before it seems natural to jump in the car with the family and head to Playland.

WA Midget racing program

In the bottom of the above mentioned box I also found these original sign up sheets.

Take a look at the names in this drivers list. Shorty Templeman, Mel Anthony and Homer Norman among others. Mel Anthony is a legend of his own and still lives here in the North West. He is turning 90 years young this year and he still races!

 

Stay tuned for a more in on the racing action and of course lots of cool pictures from the racing action.

 

The evolution of a hot rod

As I was looking through my digital photo album I ran across some older pictures of your Humble Editors 1932 Ford five window coupe.

I have not done a ton of things to this car but it is amazing how the look and feel of a hot rod can change with rather simple modification. As a hot rod can be an extension of your personality so it is important to make it the way you like it.

Here is how it looked at one point:

1932 Ford rear

 Fenders made from ’36 Ford spare tire covers in the front, home made in the rear.

Olds motor in 1932 Ford

 1956 Olds power plant.

 1932 Ford Five Window Coupe

OK, those slicks has to go and so does the drag race “high in the nose” look.

 

1932 Ford Five Window Coupe Firestone 2

Dropped original heavy axle and Firestones pie crust tireas changes the car completely.

 1932 Ford Five Window Coupe no lettering

Loosing those silly numbers on the side certainly helped to clean up the car.

At this point I started to like the car but something was still missing…

1932 Ford 5 window hood

 Aha! A hood! Yup, that added greatly to the lines. It completes the car and it flows great. Mmmm…something is still missing!

 

1932 Ford 5 window rear

 Yes, that’s it. Fenders. It puts the old back in to the car. This just shows how versitile the 1932 Ford is. It can be built in many ways and look great.

This car is now sold and Your Humble Editor is looking for something new and fun, Well, something old and fun. Like a 1937 Ford cabriolet. Know of any? Let me know.

 

Reader’s Rides: 1932 Ford Five Window

Sometimes your Humble Editor get an e-mail from a ClassicRoad reader with pictures of his or her car. Bob Mervar from Oregon state did just that and his 1932 Ford five window is too cool not to share with the world.

1932 Ford five window

The car was finished in 2009 and Bob has been driving the wheels off it ever since.

1932 Ford cruising

Some more pictures coming soon. Thanks for sharing, Bob

FOUND!! An actual service station!!

Just like it is useless to look for an old school radiator shop any more, it is also impossible to find a real gas/service station. They have all been replaced with snack peddlers with pumps outside if you are lucky.

Looking for fuel, I came across this disappearing institution: 

An actual SERVICE station!

Complete with fan belts on the wall just like it should be.

It even sported a uniformed articulate and polite young man in a uniform. Kinda cool.

 

 

 

Lets take a spin in the time machine

Sometimes I have the need to visit recycling places to see old cool stuff that I absolutely do not need. Having said that. You never know what you will stumble across.

How about an old Formica table?

What about building a house around this pink stove? I bet Elvis had one.

I have no interest in riding old bikes but they sure look cool.

Vintage oil pumps makes for great garage art but they also take up floor space.

Vintage radios are cool…to look at. Most of the time they just end up taking up shelf space.

One would think these wall games are collectible but there is very little demand.

Fun to look at but that’s it. OK, back to playing with cars!