BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part IIII

The summer in the North West have been absolutely perfect for anyone enjoying motorcycles…and dry roads!

I have been busy riding the BMW Cafe bike to the point I have not spent much time working on it. I am really liking how it handles and the power available mostly because of the serious diet I exposed the bike to.

Like any project, there is always room for improvement especially on this bike as it was a quick build. Just in time for the monthly backfire moto meet in Seattle, I got this snazzy Monza style gas cap.

 

Made in Germany, it offers excellent fit and finish. It also added about 12 horsepower.

 

I am using the small Harley blinker for tail and stop light and they were not very bright. One of the most important things you can do on a motorcycle is to be seen!

I installed these super bright LED bulbs and I probably increase the output three fold while using less load on the electrical system.

Riding a stripped down bike means that there is no place to put things and I have to at least have some tools, right?

I found this tool box at a swap meet, I was told it was from an Honda. It ended up under the seat for now. I may move it to the front of the frame, behind the fork, we’ll see.

 

It holds all of the BMW factory tools.

I replaced the valve covers with a set of the older style valve covers, they definitely changes the vibe of the bike. Next…I would like to change the gauges, we’ll see what I can come up with.

1931 Ford Model A Tudor Hot Rod Project, part 4

Came up with a name for this build:

Project Swedish Banger Tudor 

Stress cracks fixed. Once I made sure the frame was square, I also welded all the cross members to the frame rails. This helped the rigidity greatly. If I were to put a V8 in this thing I would have blasted the frame and installed boxing plates but I am also trying to get on the road this year.

.I will use tube shocks so I will not need the dog bone attachment so it was cut off. It makes the spring hanger look cleaner anyway.

I will use polyurethane bushings in the shackles so these sleeves have to be removed. After 87 years they tend to be kinda stuck but a little heat and measured amount of violence will bring them out.

This is the stuff ricers use in their poly bushings to avoid squeak. Bushing squeak sux especially if you don’t have a radio to drown out the noise!

These are 1940 Ford rear torque rods and they are much stronger and they look better than the model A part. Since I am going to loose the torque tube and run a open drive shaft, I will need some sort of torque rods for the rear axle as well.

The front end will consist of split 1936 wishbones, a 4 inch dropped axle and a reversed eye spring, self energizing Lincoln brakes, Wilson hubs and Buick finned aluminum drums. I love self energizing brakes, I just hate to have to energize them myself!
I would love an original Ford dropped axle but time demanded a quick solution. Because of the dropped axle I will have to use deep drop steering arms to clear the wish bones. a Vega box with cross steer will help this hot rod go down the road straight.
So where are we going to put this engine? How about right about here…?

I had to angle the left motor mount to clear the location of the Vega steering box. Maybe not pretty but it works. Chrome Swedish valve cover on dirty motor for effect!

There…engine is mounted.

I am telling you…Henry planned for a Volvo with four speed overdrive in the model A chassis!

Sometimes you have to roll it out for perspective. Now I realized that I need to make the trans cross member the attachment point for both front bones AND the 1940 rear radius rods.

Mo later…

1931 Ford Model A Tudor Hot Rod Project, part 3

Holy Model A body, Batman! The body just took flight!

A lonely frame waiting for better times.

With the body off the frame it is very easy to disassemble the rest.

Front and rear suspension comes apart with just a few bolts. You really appreciate…well, at least I do appreciate how simple these cars are.

Hey, it’s a model A starter kit!

The frame is so clean it actually have some black paint still on it.

The goal is to drive this car to the Goodguys show in Puyallup in late July. This will not be easy but who doesn’t like a challenge. Because of the limited time, this will not be a highly detailed hot rod. My emphasis for now will be on stance, rake, drivability and of course safety.

1931 Ford Model A Tudor Hot Rod Project, part 2

Some assembly required…after re-installing the fenders and a few more things I think I have decided to leave the patina as is. As solid as it is, I think it would be a shame to SANDBLAST and RESTORE this car. Then it would just be another shiny car.

Here is the story on it. It was used as a mail carrier in the Badlands, South Dakota. The engine gave up in 1958 and it was stored indoors until 1990 when the second owner found it. He also stored it indoors until two weeks ago when your truly became the custodian.

All of the interior is missing and the engine head is cracked so I have a clean canvas to work with.

Besides, body and paint is expensive. I will concentrate on wheels and tyres, stance, drivability, safety and comfort.

I am thinking:

Vega box with cross steer, split 1936 .’bones, drobbed axle with reversed eye spring, Lincoln brake with Buick drums, 1957 Ford column and steering wheel…for starters.

Engine…I got some ideas..

Swap Meet Loot

There is nothing more exciting than getting the parts together for a hot rod build. You have a car and a plan (hopefully!) but it needs various components. Ya sure, you can whip out your Visa card, go on the great wide internet and buy a new part or even worse, a new blister packed part! There is no sport in that!
The hunt for good used parts is the most exciting, finding the right part at the right price is the most rewarding. Sometimes the part acquired completes or improves the car, sometimes both.
To look at it more philosophically, these parts were made almost 90 years ago and who knows what they have been through or where they have been. Now, they are coming together to complete a car. How cool is that?? As a matter of fact, one parted out car may put ten other vintage cars back on the road.
Why be straight when you can be bent? Kelsey Hayes bent spoke 16 inch accessory wheels will be the rolling stock on this build. Tires will probably be 7:00 in rear, 5:25-5:50 in front. I don’t know what color for the rims yet. The swap meet is also where you can pick up twenty new 1/2 inch by twenty lug nuts for the above wheels for ten bucks.
This very nice grill shell replaces the butchered one. Quite the improvement, wouldn’t you say?

A 1931 license plate will license the car for life.

 

These ugly fender are in great condition in the areas where mine are weak. We will do some slicing and dicing.

 

Also, the cheap Swede in me appreciates a good value like the unused $69.95 P&J shocks for five American pesos.

This is a ’37 spare tire cover. I also have the surround part. Since this is going to be a driver, I think a spare tire will make sense. Who has time to call AAA when you are on the poker run, you just gotta go!

Let’s do some work!

This is the right side frame horn. The fender brace came off and this probably reflects multiple attempts to re-attach it using stick welders. Now it is just a big lump of “weld”

After removing what seemed to be a lbs of “weld”, the frame horn is ready to be reattached. If this was going to be a highboy I would probably replace this piece but the fenders will cover it.

Tacked for now so I can test fit the fenders.

Hey, it’s a model A fender patch panel. I will scribe the outline and hopefully it will fit!
Mo later…

2006 Toyota Tacoma X-Runner w. 29K miles! for sale

2006 Toyota Tacoma X-Runner with 29000 miles! Yup, it is a unicorn!

Local, 2 adult owners since new. The truck did not see water for ten years. Oil was changed every thousand miles with synthetic oil for the first ten years.

The truck is like new. Non smoker. Comes with dealer brochure, original window sticker, even the Toyota watch and test crash dummy key fob. Two keys with remote. Recent performance tires. All stock except a K&N air filter.

Extang soft bed cover.

Power Window, Power mirrors, cruise control, sliding rear window, 110V power outlet

$16,500.00 in WA state

Clicky Here for eMail

1931 Ford Model A Tudor Hot Rod Project, part 1

Walking thru a local swap meet I saw this straight model A Tudor in the corner of my eye.

I was really there to check out some motorcycle parts but…there is was.

Spending the early part of it’s life as a postal delivery car in North Dakota’s Badlands it had been enjoying a very dry climate. It was stored for decades until the previous owner bought it in 1991. It was then stored indoors until yours truly became the custodian.

Check out this quarter panel…other that being very straight, there is ZERO rust. Even the paint under the fender is instact.

So other than the fact that my welder will be bored, why do I need this car?

Cowl Porn. Again, ZERO rust. How refreshing!

So yeah, it followed me home….and I found a motorcycle tool box for twenty bucks!

One great reason is that everybody should have a hot rod. Unlike an original restoration, you have completely free hand to build and create whatever YOU want.

And the most motivating factor of all:  A ten year stretch of hot rod withdrawals!! There is only one kind of medicine for this!

Let’s get busy!

BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part III

Seat Upholstery

The rear hump need a snazzy padded area for my rump to land on when I twist the throttle on this 1000 cc German powerhouse!. This is a thin wood board and carriage bolts will hold it in place.

Anti-spin! I tacked these thin metal strips to the carriage bolts so they would not spin when I snug up the bolts.

I used soft 1 inch foam here and wrapped it with black vinyl.

Here we are waiting for the contact cement to get tacky. This is not the first time this website get tacky. (Stolen joke from the muppet show)

In retrospect, (there is always retrospect when doing new things) I would have built this seat differently. I would have just made a pan that goes on top of the seat and just covered the pan. Oh well, this is how we learn. Now I will cover front and rear and then make a pad in the center. At 100 mph it will look just fine.

This is Landau foam. Same stuff goes under the vinyl on your grandpa’s Cadillac. It is also called upholstery bondo! I use it to smooth out or soften the subject before vinyl.

With vinyl.

For some interest, I will use this pleated vinyl for the seat portion. As the seat will be lower than the stock seat I opted for high density foam. I hope it will be comfortable enough.

I am not pleased with this but I will live with in for now.

So how did it come out?

Pretty damn good for a quicky!

With a full tank of fuel it weighs 360 lbs! The stock R100 is listed at 478 lbs.

The homemade shortys offers a hard knock sound with a buffalo fart during shifts and snap, crackle and pop on deceleration. Love it!

The vintage looking tires looks just at home on this bike. It handles great and have tons of power.

 Let’s RIDE!

The work continues, part IIII here

Original 18K miles 1971 BMW R60/5 motorcycle for sale

1971 BMW R60/5 motorcycle for sale.

This is a 46 year-old classic that looks amazing. Paint appears to be all original.
New rear shocks
Washington collector plates, licensed for life.

Upgraded with stealth high intensity LED blinker bulbs that also works as brake lights in conjunction with high output strobe stop light. Also, stealth hazard lights.

Since I can’t save lives with loud pipes the bike has a powerful air horn. Stock horn comes with bike.

Upgraded with Mikuni carburetors. Stock Bing carbs comes with bike. Quick battery charger hook up.

  • Chrome headlight protector (currently off bike)
  • Passenger pegs (off bike)
  • Era correct Continental tires in good condition.
  • Complete factory tool kit
  • Owner’s manual
  • Shop Manual
  • Bike cover
  • Like new BMW Krauser hard bags with keys.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle logo

The R60/5 was produced between 1970-1973. The 599cc engine was rated at 46hp @ 6,600rpm and could move the 440 lbs. bike to a top speed of 102mph.

Prior to the R60/5 the BMW motorcycles was rather sluggish and boring.

BMW stole Hans-Günther von der Marwitz from Porsche and that was a good thing as his first job was to design a new bike…this one.

The new design called for an improved engine. The engine now uses a chain driver cam shaft and the connecting rods came from the 2.8-liter 6-cylinder car engine. The electrical system was upgraded with a 12-volt alternator and electric starter.

The new tubular frame was lightweight and 7.3-inch drum brakes were responsible for the stopping part. Another brilliant design solution by Hans-Günther (yeah, I feel like I am on a first name basis with this dude) was that the drive shaft also served as part of the swing arm.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle

The suitcases…ahem, the saddle bags are like new, not a scratch.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle saddle bags

The seat is perfect as well.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle original keys

Original keys for the saddle bags and the seat lock.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle bike cover

Bike cover…then again, why would you want to cover this beauty? I can just sit and look at it!

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle Mikunicarb

Mikuni carbs. Original Bing carbs go with the bike.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle Tools

A complete original tools kit.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle manuals

Repair manual and the original owner’s manual complete with previous owner’s handwritten notes.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle headlight chrome

Chrome headlight protector.

Even the enameled tank emblems are super nice.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle rear shocks

Sexy! The new rear shocks came delivered in red fishnet stockings. This are IKON brand and they have both adjustable pre-load settings and rebound. I added for the top cover as that makes them look like a factory part.

1971 BMW R60 motorcycle top

Summer is coming…honest!

$5500.00

BMW R100 Cafe Build, Part II

After polishing, Mr. Humpty-Dumpty rump looks pretty good as well.

For those of you that are old enough to remember The Fixx’s song “one thing leads to another…that’s just how it goes…one thing leads to another.

With my new snazzy rear end I could not clutter it up with a fender, tail lite or a license plate. I think I will mount the plate on the axle.

Yup, axle mounted license plate it is. The license light will be hidden under the seat.

 

Now the front fender is all the sudden too big. Also, that stainless bracket is totally overkill. So, bring on the diet program again.

 

The fender got a good haircut and I removed everything on the bracket that did not look like a bracket.

BMW used carriage bolts coming from the underside of the fender with ugly nuts and threads on full display on top of the fender. I reversed that using polished stainless carriage bolt for a smooth look. Besides, shiny stuff make the bike go faster.

As mentioned earlier,  I don’t want to clutter up the rear with a tail light. These are small Harley blinkers. I reworked the inside so it will accept a dual filament bulb. They will be responsible for tail light and stop light function…maybe even double as blinkers to!

 

The stock aluminum rims are in good condition but rather dull. Bring on the aluminum polish.

 

There, mo betta! Shiny good!…Also, new tires on both ends. These skinny ass tires with vintage tread pattern look right on this build.

 

This is the brake pedal and I took it off just to clean it. All the sudden I can’t live with that casting line. So…

 

Some grinding, sanding and buffing and we got ourselves a snazzy shiny pedal. As you know, shiny parts will increase power and speed.

 

I told you this was a budget build…no need to buy shorty mufflers. I took a hacksaw to the stock mufflers and made economy shortys or as some call them, Poor Man’s Rineharts” These pipes also gave the bike it’s name: “Loud mouth”

BMW Cafe Racer Build, part 3

BMW R100/7 Cafe Build, Part I

This bike had definitely been beaten with an ugly stick but it runs good. My plan for this bike was just to ride it over the summer to evaluate it and then I would build something cool. I was thinking a bobber style bike.

I just could not live with all the farkels so after an evening in the shop, the bike lost close to 75 lbs. Lighter = faster, right?

So here is bike 1.0 and I thought I could live with it for a season.

However…

I figured I would just do a quicky budget job on the bike, fix the seat and maybe spray bomb the tank so it looks a little better.

 

This is the stock rear sub assembly. Anything not needed including the lock assembly will be chopped off.

I shortened the rear hoop. I originally planned to use part of the seat foam but that got scrapped. More on this later.

 

I kept part of the stock front pan as it fits well to the tank but I added a new seat pan to fit the rear frame.

 

The plan is to have the angle of the rear hump line up with the frame.

 

Since I don’t have an English wheel…hell, I don’t even have a Swedish wheel !! so I decided to just create the hump with sheet metal and spend some time hammering in to shape.

A little mud, a little primer and we got a pretty good looking tail piece.

Since I got a new rear end I decided to give the tank some attention as well.

The yuge stock battery was located right in the middle of the frame. I would like to open up that area for that minimalistic look.

Talk about diet!! The original battery weighs 20 lbs! It is also 17 years old! Maybe time to replace it?  The lithium unit on the right is less that half the size and weighs a whopping 3.1 lbs! It is also good for 370 Cold Crank Amps.

The new battery will be housed in the new tail hump.

The plan was just to put a flat paint on the tank and tail hump but the flat clear came out kind of hazy so with nothing to loose I leaned in to it with a buffer.

Hey, that looks pretty good.

More later…

BMW Cafe Racer Build, Part 2